Why Bell Canyon and Why 9 Mustang?

BellCanyonEstate
9 Mustang Lane BellCanyonestate.com

Are you looking for a Home With Privacy that You can Raise a Family and Still Work from Home?

This is the place – 5+ Acres set back from a cul da sac with the a private gate making the estate double gated with the 24/7 Guard Shack.

TOP TWELVE MOVING MISTAKES

BREAK DOWN MOVING TASKS INTO A SCHEDULE WITHOUT MAKING BIG MISTAKES IN PACKING

Oh my gosh – wouldn’t it be so nice to magically appear in your new Home Purchase with all your stuff magically appearing. Breaking down the Moving, packing process into to-do lists will help make the transaction less stressful.

You’ve signed all the paperwork and the ball is rolling ….

Research ahead of time with Better Business Bureau, recommendations from family and friends, Yelp reviews, and others.

Consider checking with your Insurance Agent if you need coverage for your move. When you contact Movers ask what Insurance Coverage they have or if it is already covered in your policy.

If you are moving to a brand new area, research banks in the area, Doctors, and Schools. Keep paperwork in a special file or scan onto an app on your phone.

Get 3 written estimates from licensed moving companies. You might even want to have a moving company come to your home to go over your inventory and give you a REAL estimate.

Keep a running list of Businesses and Companies you need to send a change of address. Remember online companies, too.

Put boxes in each room – make a room by room plan.

Use up food in your Freezer and Refrigerator – check you Subscribe and Save Orders on Amazon to make sure goodies are not going to the old address.

Put aside valuables, paperwork, and heirlooms, pack them with your own move. Do not put valuables with a moving company.

Take photos of all big ticket items to make sure they do not get scratched or dented in the move.

BIGGEST 12 MOVING MISTAKES

  1. Packing the items you use daily too early.
  2. Packing your important contact information – important papers for Insurance, Health, Licensees, etc.
  3. Packing items that you will be donating – don’t ever intend to use again.
  4. Hiring A Mover at the Last Minute.
  5. Choosing the Lowest Priced Mover.
  6. Packing Lots of Heavy Items in a Huge Box.
  7. Using Produce Boxes from the Grocery store – – can have pests in them.
  8. Not packing items per each room for next location.
  9. Not getting Mover’s Quote in writing.
  10. Spending too much times wrapping up items that are not valuable.
  11. Not making a Checklist.
  12. Not keeping an emergency first aid kit handy.

How To SEARCH your Property History Six Ways

How to Search Your Property’s History?

Take some time to read this article before you buy a house and learn how you can find out all there’s to know about the property’s past!

There could be a bunch of reasons why you’d want to know the history of your house (or house to be)… 

And the reasons could be a mix of genuine necessity and plain human curiosity.

Those with a curious mind would probably want to know, what was their house like decades ago and what families have lived there over the years…if the walls could talk.

Whereas, those with a genuine need may be digging the history because they’re about to purchase a new place.

If you fall in any of the two categories this article is definitely for you!

So, let’s start our search…

1) Sift through the Property Listings

Make use of this guide and learn how to delve into the history of your own house – that’s so exciting, isn’t it?

That’s where you should get started!

According to a recent survey, about 84% of the buyers looking for a property’s history find the online listing descriptions “very useful.”

How to get there? Easy…

Just Google the property’s address and it’ll take you right to the property’s description.

But, the descriptions will provide only limited information. So if you’re looking to dig deeper (like old photos), the second option is the Multiple Listing Service (MLS).

Remember, the MLS is exclusively for real estate agents so you’d want to get in touch with one to give you access to the MLS. Good Luck.

2) Use the Public Records

Yes, property records are public information and they are open to everyone.

You can begin searching through the public records by using the Public Records Online Directory which is free to use.

But, not every state or county keeps such records online and if that’s the case you’ll probably have to drive to the City Hall, regional tax office or wherever they store the archives in your locality.  

Once you have your hands on the public records a heap of useful (and useless) information will open up to you.

The data you may get in the public records includes: 

– Tax history 

– Owners’ history

– Property deeds

– Litigation history

– Architectural type

– Class of property, and… much more!  

3) National Registry of Historic Places

If the property you’re interested in is an old historic house then you can look up its history through the National Register of History Places.

And if your house is not on their list another very similar resource at hand is State Historic Preservation Office.

Usually, if your house is historic its history must be recorded with those two. 

Try them, and see what you can find…

You can begin searching through the public records by using the Public Records Online Directory which is free to use.

But, not every state or county keeps such records online and if that’s the case you’ll probably have to drive to the City Hall, regional tax office or wherever they store the archives in your locality.  

Once you have your hands on the public records a heap of useful (and useless) information will open up to you.

The data you may get in the public records includes: 

– Tax history 

– Owners’ history

– Property deeds

– Litigation history

– Architectural type

– Class of property, and… much more!  

3) National Registry of Historic Places

If the property you’re interested in is an old historic house then you can look up its history through the National Register of History Places.

And if your house is not on their list another very similar resource at hand is State Historic Preservation Office.

Usually, if your house is historic its history must be recorded with those two. 

Try them, and see what you can find…

4) Look through Census Records

That’s a great source if you’re like a Sherlock Holmes kind of person.

Because through the census records you can access the information related to the previous owners.

You could find out, who lived in your house before you, how many children they had, names, birthplaces, marital status and all that goes into a census record.

But the older the record the slimmer the chances of enough information, particularly in the US. 

You know why? 

Because most of the oldest census records got burnt down in a fire in 1921 in the Commerce Department Building!

5) Have a Chat with Neighbors

Well, this is a very good, non-official, way to get to know about a house’s history. Isn’t it?

Just strike up a talk with a neighbor and ask them about the past of the property.

If they’ve been living there for a long time (and they’ve been nosy enough) who could tell you better about the house than they can?

But, yeah, they can’t give you the official version, obviously.

It’s just in most humans’ (or neighbors’) nature to blow things out of proportion and tell you cooked-up stories… 

6) Ask a Local Real Estate Agent

This can be a really useful and effective source, but it’s most likely NOT free!

A local real estate agent can tell you all about a property.

They can give you any details you want, plus they can even advise you whether you should go for the deal or not, but you’re going to have to dish out some cash first!

No… That’s Not All!

The above six sources are the best ones to take you back to the roots of your house but they are not the only ones.

Depending on your house’s age and your state’s history you can find tons of additional sources…

Like the old historical maps of your state or city, books and magazines related to your area, police records, fire records, and so on…

So, don’t give up. Keep digging. Something will come out of it.

Yeah, that’s all now!  

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